You should therefore keep all documents that serve as proof of overnight stays on campsites or in hotels.

November 14, 2020

You should therefore keep all documents that serve as proof of overnight stays on campsites or in hotels.

You should therefore keep all documents that serve as proof of overnight stays on campsites or in hotels. If you cannot provide proof, you may be declared a wild camper and have to pay a fine of up to 140 euros.

High penalties are not uncommon

“Such high penalties for supposed and real wild campers are not uncommon,” the ÖCC expert notes. “However, the regulations differ from country to country. It is therefore advisable to find out more in advance.” Basically: In northern countries the laws regarding wild camping are not as strict as in the south. In Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden it is allowed, with minor restrictions, to camp for several nights in the great outdoors.

In contrast, two of the most popular holiday destinations for Austrians according to ÖAMTC travel monitoring, namely Croatia and Greece, have particularly strict regulations when it comes to camping. “There you are not allowed to spend the night in rest stops, in parking lots and not even on private property,” warns Mehlmauer.

France: more liberal, but more confusing

The situation in France, on the other hand, is somewhat more liberal, but also more confusing. “Here you can camp on private property with the owner’s permission. However, this freedom does not apply if you are on the coast,” explains the ÖCC expert. “Camping is also prohibited near places of interest.” Who ignores that and z. B. hits in a nature or water protection area, can expect a fine of up to 1,500 euros.

The most important regulations for camping in all European countries are below

www.campingclub.at

clearly summarized. There you will also find extensive information on wild camping and the official pitches outside the campsites. ÖCC members can also use the exclusive ÖCC travel service and receive personal advice.

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Spending the night in the great outdoors is still an adventure that many campers dream of. “Occasionally, however, because the fun is simply not allowed and can be punished,” explains Tomas Mehlmauer from the Austrian Camping Club (ÖCC).

Those who cannot show proof of overnight accommodation when entering the Austrian border may have to dig deep into their pockets.me 123 You should therefore keep all documents that serve as proof of overnight stays on campsites or in hotels. If you cannot provide proof, you may be declared a wild camper and have to pay a fine of up to 140 euros.

High penalties are not uncommon

“Such high penalties for supposed and real wild campers are not uncommon,” the ÖCC expert notes. “However, the regulations differ from country to country. It is therefore advisable to find out more in advance.” Basically: In northern countries the laws regarding wild camping are not as strict as in the south. In Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden, camping for several nights in the great outdoors is permitted with minor restrictions.

In contrast, two of the most popular holiday destinations for Austrians according to ÖAMTC travel monitoring, namely Croatia and Greece, have particularly strict regulations when it comes to camping. “There you are not allowed to spend the night in rest stops, parking lots and not even on private property,” warns Mehlmauer.

France: more liberal, but more confusing

The situation in France, on the other hand, is somewhat more liberal, but also more confusing. “Here you can camp on private property with the owner’s permission. However, this freedom does not apply if you are on the coast,” explains the ÖCC expert. “Camping is also forbidden near places of interest.” Who ignores that and z. B. hits in a nature or water protection area, can expect a fine of up to 1,500 euros.

The most important regulations for camping in all European countries are below

www.campingclub.at

clearly summarized. There you will also find extensive information on wild camping and the official pitches outside the campsites. ÖCC members can also use the exclusive ÖCC travel service and receive personal advice.

Read news for free for 1 month now! * * The test ends automatically.

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Spending the night in the great outdoors is still an adventure that many campers dream of. “Occasionally, however, because the fun is simply not allowed and can be punished,” explains Tomas Mehlmauer from the Austrian Camping Club (ÖCC).

Those who cannot show proof of overnight accommodation when entering the Austrian border may have to dig deep into their pockets. You should therefore keep all documents that serve as proof of overnight stays on campsites or in hotels. If you cannot provide proof, you may be declared a wild camper and have to pay a fine of up to 140 euros.

High penalties are not uncommon

“Such high penalties for supposed and real wild campers are not uncommon,” the ÖCC expert notes. “However, the regulations differ from country to country. It is therefore advisable to find out more in advance.” Basically: In northern countries the laws regarding wild camping are not as strict as in the south. In Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden it is allowed, with minor restrictions, to camp for several nights in the great outdoors.

In contrast, two of the most popular holiday destinations for Austrians according to ÖAMTC travel monitoring, namely Croatia and Greece, have particularly strict regulations when it comes to camping. “There you are not allowed to spend the night in rest stops, parking lots and not even on private property,” warns Mehlmauer.

France: more liberal, but more confusing

The situation in France, on the other hand, is somewhat more liberal, but also more confusing. “Here you can camp on private property with the owner’s permission. However, this freedom does not apply if you are on the coast,” explains the ÖCC expert. “Camping is also forbidden near places of interest.” Who ignores that and z. B. hits in a nature or water protection area, can expect a fine of up to 1,500 euros.

The most important regulations for camping in all European countries are below

www.campingclub.at

clearly summarized. There you will also find extensive information on wild camping and the official pitches outside the campsites. ÖCC members can also use the exclusive ÖCC travel service and get personal advice.

Read news for free for 1 month now! * * The test ends automatically.

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Spending the night in the great outdoors is still an adventure that many campers dream of. “Occasionally, however, because the fun is simply not allowed and can be punished,” explains Tomas Mehlmauer from the Austrian Camping Club (ÖCC).

Those who cannot show proof of overnight accommodation when entering the Austrian border may have to dig deep into their pockets. You should therefore keep all documents that serve as proof of overnight stays on campsites or in hotels. If you cannot provide proof, you may be declared a wild camper and have to pay a fine of up to 140 euros.

High penalties are not uncommon

“Such high penalties for supposed and real wild campers are not uncommon,” the ÖCC expert notes. “However, the regulations differ from country to country. It is therefore advisable to find out more in advance.” Basically: In northern countries the laws regarding wild camping are not as strict as in the south. In Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden it is allowed, with minor restrictions, to camp for several nights in the great outdoors.

In contrast, two of the most popular holiday destinations for Austrians according to ÖAMTC travel monitoring, namely Croatia and Greece, have particularly strict regulations when it comes to camping. “There you are not allowed to spend the night in rest stops, parking lots and not even on private property,” warns Mehlmauer.

France: more liberal, but more confusing

The situation in France, on the other hand, is somewhat more liberal, but also more confusing. “Here you can camp on private property with the owner’s permission. However, this freedom does not apply if you are on the coast,” explains the ÖCC expert. “Camping is also forbidden near places of interest.” Who ignores that and z. B. hits in a nature or water protection area, can expect a fine of up to 1,500 euros.

The most important regulations for camping in all European countries are below

www.campingclub.at

clearly summarized. There you will also find extensive information on wild camping and the official pitches outside the campsites. ÖCC members can also use the exclusive ÖCC travel service and receive personal advice.

Read news for free for 1 month now! * * The test ends automatically.

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Spending the night in the great outdoors is still an adventure that many campers dream of. “Occasionally, however, because the fun is simply not allowed and can be punished,” explains Tomas Mehlmauer from the Austrian Camping Club (ÖCC).

Those who cannot show proof of overnight accommodation when entering the Austrian border may have to dig deep into their pockets. You should therefore keep all documents that serve as proof of overnight stays on campsites or in hotels. If you cannot provide proof, you may be declared a wild camper and have to pay a fine of up to 140 euros.

High penalties are not uncommon

“Such high penalties for supposed and real wild campers are not uncommon,” the ÖCC expert notes. “However, the regulations differ from country to country. It is therefore advisable to find out more in advance.” Basically: In northern countries the laws regarding wild camping are not as strict as in the south. In Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden it is allowed, with minor restrictions, to camp for several nights in the great outdoors.

In contrast, two of the most popular holiday destinations for Austrians according to ÖAMTC travel monitoring, namely Croatia and Greece, have particularly strict regulations when it comes to camping. “There you are not allowed to spend the night in rest stops, parking lots and not even on private property,” warns Mehlmauer.

France: more liberal, but more confusing

The situation in France, on the other hand, is somewhat more liberal, but also more confusing. “Here you can camp on private property with the owner’s permission. However, this freedom does not apply if you are on the coast,” explains the ÖCC expert. “Camping is also forbidden near places of interest.” Who ignores that and z. B. hits in a nature or water protection area, can expect a fine of up to 1,500 euros.

The most important regulations for camping in all European countries are below

www.campingclub.at

clearly summarized. There you will also find extensive information on wild camping and the official pitches outside the campsites. ÖCC members can also use the exclusive ÖCC travel service and receive personal advice.

Read news for free for 1 month now! * * The test ends automatically.

More on this ▶

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Comments

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Spending the night in the great outdoors is still an adventure that many campers dream of. “Occasionally, however, because the fun is simply not allowed and can be punished,” explains Tomas Mehlmauer from the Austrian Camping Club (ÖCC).